Au revoir, eBay ~ or, sour grapes only produce whine.

We don’t like to publicly rant or whine about things here at Earthworks. We believe that the buying experience for our customers should be like a lovely evening at the theatre, you should just experience the best part and not be privy to all the stressful stuff that goes on behind the scenes. However, for the sake of solidarity with our fellow online sellers, what follows is a bit of a whining rant.

EBAY SQUEEZING THE LITTLE MAN - EARTHWORKS JOURNALS

Doing what we do for a living, making things and hoping the buying public will exchange money for those things, can be quite an unstable existence at times. We have no problem with the actual making of the things, we’re confident about that, it’s the bit that comes naturally to us; but it’s getting those things in front of the buying public which can be the tricky part.

Samantha and I started making things in the mid-1990s. Of course, this was before the time when everyone had a computer in their home and when the Internet, to most people, was just some vague and suspiciously ethereal entity used only by governments, backroom boffins and Sci-Fi criminals. What on Earth could a couple of simple craftspeople want with anything like that? No, back in the olden days, before ebay became popular, before Etsy was even a twinkle in a proto-hipster’s eye, the only real recourse for selling our goods was the humble craft fair.

We had our first craft fair stall in 1996 and it was terrifying. We’d never shown the things we made to anyone other than friends and family so to put them out there for sale was a daunting prospect. It was only a tiny church hall type of a thing and we made £36.50 which, to us then, was a roaring success. Over the next nine years we went on to bigger and better fairs and shows, travelling all over the country.

It was exhausting!

Ok, we were full of the vigour of youth back then but working all hours Monday to Friday to make stock and then to travel and sell at shows at the weekends really takes it out of you. There was just no let up. And then there was the constant worry of the possibility of not making any money, which happened often. Anyone that works the shows will know that there are so many variables at work which can decide whether you’ll come out of a show relatively wealthy and happy or completely skint and miserable; the time of year; the weather; the co-incidence of a big sporting event; the weather; the death of a major public figure; the weather. But, it wasn’t all bad, spending the weekend camping in our converted van in the grounds of a stately home in glorious weather with crowds of people queueing to buy your goods and telling you how wonderful your work is can be a great experience; and we met some fascinating and incredibly talented people on the circuit too.

But, all good things come to an end. The shows got more and more expensive to attend, and the attendees got less and less, so, we in turn were making less and less money at them. We found we were getting progressively poorer and progressively more exhausted. It looked like we were going to have to give it all up and get proper jobs. In 2005, as a last ditch effort we decided we’d have a go at this internet thing and put something up for sale on this website we’d heard about. It was called eBay.

It was quite a slow start but we soon built up a successful shop on eBay and were able to cut the shows out completely. We still went to them, of course, but as punters instead of sellers. We’d see all of our old friends still manning their stalls and we’d tell them about how incredible eBay was, how we were still selling our goods even though we were out gallivanting. The old stalwarts were an untrusting lot though and most declared it to be a flash in the pan, this fashion for online selling would soon pass and we’d be back at the shows with our tails between our legs.

We loved eBay back then. Selling online freed up so much of our time so we could concentrate on growing the business. In the following years we opened a shop on Etsy and set up our own website. Everything was good.

Then, a few years ago, the rot began to set in. Ebay suddenly wasn’t such a nice place to be, new management came in and, with them, new rules, restrictions and regulations. It seemed that every few months we were having to update every single listing on our shop, including having to take new photographs, to keep up with their constantly changing image size requirements. While we were doing this we were treated to more and more factory produced competition (some of them even having the gall to steal our designs!), so our humble selves sank further and further into the black, unseen depths of the eBay ranking systems. Then they decided to penalise us for not being able to send out items out within two days of purchase, there was no room on eBay for custom made goods any more. They were sapping the love out of our business by constantly sending us emails to tell us how they would punish us with lower visibility and ever escalating fees if we didn’t conform to what they wanted us to be.

And then, of course, in 2014 eBay failed to keep up with changes to the Google search system which meant that we were becoming even more invisible!

To top it all off, a few days ago we received an email from eBay telling us that from July of this year (2017) every single one of our photographs on our eBay shop, the photographs we have spent countless hours working on, will all go into a central eBay catalogue and will be free to use by any eBay seller in the whole world. Well, isn’t that just incredibly magnanimous of you eBay? How lovely of you to give away our hard work to anyone that asks for it. Of course, this isn’t going to benefit the smaller sellers on eBay, they are the ones who have been toiling away, like us, to produce the photographs; this is only going to benefit the massive sellers, the ‘pile it high, sell it cheap’ sellers; they’re the ones eBay want to develop on the back of the those that still have a passion for what they do.

 

However, our Etsy shop has gone from strength to strength. Our own website ticks over quite nicely and, as some of you will know, we’re in the process of building a brand new online home for Earthworks Journals which will hopefully be even better. With this in mind, we’ve made the decision to close our eBay shop for good.

If any of our eBay customers would like to know where we are then you can visit our website here:

EARTHWORKS JOURNALS WEBSITE

Or our Etsy shop here:

EARTHWORKS JOURNALS ETSY SHOP

Twelve long years we’ve been with you, eBay. It’s traditional to give silk as a gift for a twelfth anniversary present and, although I admire anyone who has the wit and imagination to break with tradition, I think giving us a big box of despair instead was a bit of a kick in the teeth. We’ve poured our heart and soul, and our time and money, into our relationship with you, eBay, but it’s time we moved on. As a great philosopher once said:

“At first I was afraid, I was petrified, I kept thinking I could never live without you by my side; but then I spent so many nights thinking how you did me wrong and I grew strong. I learned how to get along.”

So, it’s au revoir, eBay! I’d like to say it’s been nice knowing you … but we both know that would be a lie. I’d like to say, it’s not you, it’s me … but we both know it’s you. Sure, we had some fun in the old days, but you changed and the bitterness set in. So, eBay, by the time you read this message, I’ll be gone.

But then, I doubt very much you’ll even notice me leaving.

 

POSTSCRIPT

If there are any other small businesses out there, crafts-people, artists, vintage goods sellers, who feel stuck in a rut with their selling outlets (we know from the eBay forums that there are many of you) then we know how it can feel like you’re desperately trying to swim against the spiralling waters which are trying to drag you down the plug-hole. Just remember that these outlets need you to exist, you’re the creator and they are merely the middle-men. They often seem to forget that we, as sellers, are their customers and we should be treated with same respect as our customers expect from us. So, if one outlet isn’t working then don’t let them drag you down, get out there and find what works for you.

We’re lucky to be living in an age where there are so many possibilities.

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